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"Goodbye, Jean-Luc, I'm gonna miss you. You had such potential. But then again, all good things must come to an end."
- Q, Star Trek: TNG

PC Game Reviews

Borderlands: Find Your Very Favorite Gun

by Ken Newquist / November 11, 2009

"Six men came to kill me one time. And the best of 'em carried this. It's a Callahan full-bore auto-lock. Customized trigger, double cartridge thorough gauge. It is my very favorite gun." -- Janye, Firefly

That quote is the reason why Borderlands rocks. Sure, it's a competent shooter with some basic role-playing aspects thrown in, and yeah, it's got kick ass multiplayer campaign, but in the end, it comes down to the guns.

More specifically, it's about finding your very favorite gun.

SciFiWire.com: Demigod Reviewed

by Ken Newquist / May 14, 2009

My review of Demigod, the multiplayer god smachdown, is up at SciFiWire.com. This is the first Windows game I've reviewed in ... well, I'm not sure the last time I reviewed a Windows game. it might have been Stardock's Galatic Civilizations game (the original, not the sequel) back in 2003. The amusing thing? I actually played it on my Mac, dual-booting into Windows thanks to Bootcamp.

Submerge yourself in the artistic warfare of BioShock

by Ken Newquist / October 18, 2007

Roger Ebert has famously said that video games may have the potential to be beautiful, well crafted, and technically competent … but they are not art. In a later column, he asked what video game made to date could possibly stand up against the greatest movies ever made?

Defend Reality from a Demonic Invasion in Warcraft III

by Ken Newquist / October 9, 2003

Warcraft III is a real-time strategy game in which players take on the role of one of four factions in a bid to save -- or damn -- reality from a demonic invasion. The game's divided into three modes: story (single player), customized game (single player) and multi-player.

In story mode there are four thematically-linked campaigns, one for each of the game's races: human, undead, orc, and elf. Each advances the overall story, which involves the demonic forces of the Burning Legions' attempt to invade the real world. Only one individual -- the mystical prophet -- is aware of the Legion's intentions, and he does his best to warn the good people of the coming threat. However, the Prophet's message is one that few embrace -- he advocates fleeing before the heralds of the demons: undead under the command of the lich Ner'zhul. That's more than Prince Arthas can take -- he steadfastly refuses to abandon his homeland, and instead journeys north to fight the undead menace. There he must decide between vengeance and salvation, and the wrong choice could damn the world.

Master of Orion 3 Becomes the Failed Apprentice

by Ken Newquist / April 16, 2003

Book Cover I wanted Master of Orion 3 to be the greatest turn-based strategy game of all time. I wanted it to be a worthy heir to its predecessors. I wanted to spend endless hours lost in its strategic depths, gladly loosing a few hours of sleep to secure victory over a strategic star system.

I wanted all of this ... and I got none of it. Master of Orion 3 is one of the biggest gaming disappointments I've ever experienced -- it's the Highlander 2 of computer games, and that's saying a lot.